U.S. Army Medical Department, Enlisted Corps
Skip Navigation, go to content

ACCESS TO CARE External Link, Opens in New Window

ABOUT

SME (CAC users)

EMDP2

TWI

AECP

BEST MEDIC 2017

ENLISTED CORPS MILSUITE
(CAC users)

HISTORY OF THE ENLISTED CORPS External Link, Opens in New Window

HISTORICAL PHOTOS external link

OUTLOOK - NEWSLETTER
(CAC users)

"Victory Medics" Conduct Mass Casualty Medical Exercise During Saber Guardian 17

"Victory Medics" Conduct Mass Casualty Medical Exercise During Saber Guardian 17
By CPT Jerome Ferrin, July 18, 2017

MIHAIL KOGALNICEANU, Romania - "Victory Medics" participated with Soldiers from nine different countries in a mass casualty, or MASCAL, exercise, July 16, during Saber Guardian 17.

Participants included the Balkan Medical Task Force, which is comprised of Soldiers and equipment from Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovenia, Macedonia, Serbia, Slovenia, and Montenegro; a Romanian Role 2 hospital and a streamlined portion of the 212th Combat Support Hospital.

In addition, several Military medical professionals from the United Kingdom worked and trained with the 212th CSH and 30th Medical Brigade headquarters. The 30th Medical Brigade is a subordinate unit to the 21st Theater Sustainment Command. "Forming friendships with Soldiers from another nation is just about the most rewarding thing I have experienced in the Army so far," said MAJ Thomas M. Lehmann, 30th Medical Brigade Pharmacist. "This is a large part of 'strengthening the alliance.'"

MASCAL exercises are designed to stretch and grow medical professionals' ability to deal with crisis situations. MASCALs do this by creating a situation where the type or severity of casualties exceed the capacity and capability of available medical assets. MASCAL and exercising the ability to mobilize combat support hospitals trains the Soldiers and proves the CSH's readiness to deploy and provide surgical care to Soldiers injured on battlefield.

"A MASCAL Exercise contributes to Unit readiness by ensuring that we are trained in our roles and treat the patients properly," said SPC Andrew P. Hunt, Licensed Practical Nurse, 212th CSH. "With it, we understand the complexity and chaos that ensues with the MASCAL, because our capabilities are pushed to the limit where we learn to be ready and adapt to the situation at hand."

The MASCAL exercise not only exercises and proves the readiness of the combat hospitals, but the entire medical system around them. Soldiers from the 421st Multifunctional Medical Battalion provided front line ambulances to transport casualties. The 10th Combat Aviation Brigade's HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopters and the Romanian's provided IAR-330 Puma helicopters provided medical evacuation support. Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft provided air lift of simulated casualties to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, where the training continued with Regional Heath Command-Europe's Maroon Surge, an operation designed to prepare Landstuhl Regional Medical Center and Regional Health Command-Europe, for a large influx of patients from a combat theater.

"This is Army Medicine at its best--Soldiers providing care with our NATO allies and partners," said COL Timothy G. Bosetti, Commander 30th Medical Brigade. "Treating patients from point of injury back to definitive care. This is the premier expeditionary, and globally integrated medical force, ready to meet the ever-changing challenges of today, and tomorrow."

CAMP MK - U.S. Air Force SSgt Rachel Wilson, 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, and a Romanian Soldier, practice loading patients onto a C-130 Hercules Aircraft during the MASCAL exercise Saber Guardian 17, at Camp MK, Jul. 16, 2017. (Photo Credit: CPT Jerome Ferrin)
CAMP MK - U.S. Air Force SSgt Rachel Wilson, 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, and a Romanian Soldier, practice loading patients onto a C-130 Hercules Aircraft during the MASCAL exercise Saber Guardian 17, at Camp MK, Jul. 16, 2017. (Photo Credit: CPT Jerome Ferrin)